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Cheap Los Angeles Rams Jersey Wholesale From China For Sale

Todd Gurley and the Rams

Todd Gurley and the Rams

Not only did the Los Angeles Rams finish first in the NFC West with an 11-5 record in 2017, but the team also swept our postseason awards, as chosen by NFL Nation NFC West reporters Alden Gonzalez (Rams), Brady Henderson (Seahawks), Nick Wagoner (49ers) and Josh Weinfuss (Cardinals).

Coach of the Year: Sean McVay, Rams

Considering that McVay is the favorite to be the NFL Coach of the Year, it was a no-brainer that he would earn that honor for the NFC West division. McVay was a unanimous choice here, and why wouldn’t he be? All McVay, who at 30 was the youngest head coach in modern league history at the time of his hire, did in his first season was lead one of the most dramatic turnarounds in recent memory. He took a team that was 4-12 and dreadful offensively a year ago and turned it into a supercharged juggernaut that went 11-5 and won the NFC West. McVay’s influence was most evident in the offense, taking a group that averaged a league-low 14 points per game in 2016 and turning it into a unit (with some key additions at receiver and on the offensive line) that posted 29.9 points per game in 2017. It was the first time in the Super Bowl era an offense went from worst to first in one year.

“It’s just everything he’s done since he got here,” Rams quarterback Jared Goff told reporters of McVay’s impact. “From Day 1, it’s been so impressive. He hasn’t changed a bit. Same demeanor every day and goes about his business the same way, and I think it rubs off on the players and rubs off on me, for sure.”

Along the way, McVay helped Goff erase any premature bust labels and helped running back Todd Gurley emerge as a legitimate MVP candidate. — Wagoner

Offensive Player of the Year: Todd Gurley, RB, Rams

A lot happened when Gurley sprinted 57 yards to the end zone against the Seahawks in Week 15. That score gave Gurley’s Rams a 34-0 lead, putting out of reach a game that gave Los Angeles a viselike grip on the NFC West title. And as Gurley raced past Seattle’s defense for his third of four touchdowns that December afternoon, he also thrust himself into the MVP conversation. Gurley led the NFL with 2,093 scrimmage yards, despite sitting out Week 17 with the division already clinched. He finished second in rushing (1,305) and receiving yards (788) among running backs after being edged out in both categories on the final day. Gurley’s 19 combined rushing and receiving touchdowns were five more than any other player.

“He’s really the centerpiece,” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said of Gurley, whose stats might be good enough for him to become the first non-quarterback to win league MVP since Adrian Peterson did it in 2012 with the Vikings.

“That was the last time a back won the MVP, and this year should be the next time,” Rams center John Sullivan, a teammate of Peterson that season, told ESPN.com. “Who knows how it will play out, but look, Todd is the best back in the league. And that’s what Adrian was at that time.” — Henderson

Defensive Player of the Year: Aaron Donald, DT, Rams

Donald missed the first regular-season game, sat out the last one and spent an entire summer in a contractual holdout. He still led the league in pressures and led defensive tackles in sacks, and he might just win NFL Defensive Player of the Year. Rams defensive coordinator Wade Phillips said Donald is “obviously the best defensive player in the league,” so of course he was voted the best defensive player in the NFC West this season.

“He’s not superhuman,” Phillips said, “but he’s almost unstoppable.”

Despite facing constant double- and triple-teams, Donald registered a career-high-tying 11 sacks in 14 games. (He would’ve had a 12th in Week 16, but the NFL took it away because Tennessee Titans quarterback Marcus Mariota picked up his own fumble and ran with it.) Donald’s 91 pressures were more than any other player, according to Pro Football Focus, even though it’s significantly more difficult to pressure the quarterback from between the tackles. In a first-round playoff loss to the Atlanta Falcons, Donald registered a season-high 11 pressures, 10 of which came in the first half.

“We’ve never seen anybody pressure the quarterback as much as he does,” Rams edge rusher Matt Longacre said of his teammate. — Gonzalez

Rookie of the Year: Cooper Kupp, WR, Rams

Hollywood wasn’t too big for Kupp. The small-school wide receiver shined as bright as any movie premiere as a rookie for the Rams, who selected Kupp in the third round out of Eastern Washington. Kupp, who played alongside the likes of Sammy Watkins and Robert Woods, led the Rams in receiving with 869 yards. He also led the team with 95 targets and converted a team-high 42 first downs. He was counted on by Goff and McVay from the onset of his rookie season, running 24 routes in his debut in Week 1, which resulted in four catches for 76 yards and a touchdown. He ran 425 routes in 2017, the second most on the Rams.

But Kupp’s impact wasn’t limited. He was second on the team in receptions, yards after catch and receiving yards after contact.

“Regardless of where you come from, I believe in myself coming into this and being able to play at this level, so it’s obviously great being able to help produce. But I think just being a part of this team, having coaches that put you in the right position players alongside you that make this game easy,” he said.

Kupp, who had five touchdown catches, was consistent throughout the season, with at least two catches in every game. His biggest games of the year came down the stretch. He had 116 yards on a career-high eight catches in a Week 12 win over the New Orleans Saints. Two weeks later, in a loss to the Philadelphia Eagles, he set a career high with 118 yards, complemented by a touchdown, on five catches. That included a 64-yard reception — the longest of his career. — Weinfuss

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Baltimore Ravens

Baltimore Ravens

We focus a lot on what the Baltimore Ravens are doing wrong. You have to identify a problem to fix a problem, so this makes sense. The Ravens are doing some things well though, and identifying these things is important too.

The Baltimore Ravens have so many problems that Twitter’s new 280 character limit can barely fit a list of all of them. It’s the bye week though and I’m tired of beating a dead horse. Today I’m going to be positive and tell you the three things the Ravens are actually doing quite well.

1. Pass Defense:

The Baltimore Ravens have the third best pass defense in the NFL. The Ravens are only giving up 184.7 yards through the air per contest. When you consider that the Ravens have played Antonio Brown, A.J. Green, Amari Cooper and Jarvis Landry that’s a pretty good reason to pat the cornerbacks on the back. Jimmy Smith has made a serious case for being considered the best cornerback in football. Brandon Carr has played very well and Marlon Humphrey has lived up to the first round billing.

The Ravens defense is not being let down by the secondary. When the defense has been aggressive and the front seven has taken care of business, the defense has been unstoppable. The corners have bee the defense has been the most consistent position group of the team. The safety play could be better but it hasn’t been bad. Most of the problems stem from Dean Pees using Tony Jefferson wrong. He is a great safety but he plays his best football in the box. The secondary is really hard to complain about. The defense has been inconsistent against the run and rushing the passer. Covering receivers hasn’t been a problem for the purple and black.

Cheap Baltimore Ravens Jersey Wholesale China Free Shipping

 Baltimore Ravens

Baltimore Ravens

A little more than a month ago, the Ravens stood 2-0 with perhaps the best defense in football and robust hopes for the rest of the 2017 season.

The ensuing weeks have not been kind, however, with John Harbaugh’s team dropping four of five games and a different problem emerging in each loss. As they prepare to host the Miami Dolphins in prime time Thursday before a national TV audience with CBS’ No. 1 broadcast crew, the Ravens are searching for answers on both offense and defense. Their home-field advantage has been nonexistent, and ticket holders left blocks of seats empty the last time the Ravens played at M&T Bank Stadium. If the Ravens don’t right their ship quickly, they could fall out of postseason contention for the third year in a row and the fourth time in five seasons.
Ravens favored by a field goal over Dolphins in Week 8 matchup

The offense, debilitated by injuries to key linemen and receivers, has fallen short of subterranean preseason predictions, ranking 31st in the league in yards per game. That’s down from 17th last year, when it was already viewed as a toothless attack.

The more startling downturn has occurred on the other side of the ball, where the Ravens’ historically stingy run defense is allowing more rushing yards per game than any other team in the league. The Ravens ranked fifth in the league in rush defense last year and have fallen out of the top half of the league just once in Harbaugh’s 10-year tenure.

That hasn’t been the only blow to the team’s core identity. The Ravens have traditionally held one of the strongest home-field advantages in the NFL. But they’ve lost two of three games at M&T Bank Stadium this year, one a 26-9 stomping by the archrival Pittsburgh Steelers and the other a sloppy overtime loss to the Chicago Bears, who came to town 1-4. Chicago’s Mitchell Trubisky became the first rookie quarterback ever to beat a Harbaugh team in Baltimore.

Also at the Bears game, an unusual number of seats remained empty, a reality not reflected by the announced sellout crowd of 70,616.

Despite all the bleak tidings, the Ravens do not sound like a team on the verge of crisis.

At an appearance in Ocean City last week, owner Steve Bisciotti said of Harbaugh and general manager Ozzie Newsome: “I don’t think they’re doing anything wrong.”

The dean of the locker room, linebacker Terrell Suggs, said the team’s defense can still be “magical.”

“You want to be good. You want to dominate everywhere, every facet of the game,” Suggs said at his locker Tuesday. “Now, we’ve just got to tighten the screws a little bit. We’ve just got to stop the leakage. We’re not hitting the panic button just yet. We’ll be all right.”

Suggs also said “there is no stadium like M&T,” a vote of confidence in a home crowd that hasn’t always filled the seating bowl and that booed the Ravens after they knelt in prayer before the national anthem in Week 4.

The organization is concerned about waning fan enthusiasm after two consecutive home losses and two straight years not making the playoffs. Empty seats are always more likely in such scenarios, said team president Dick Cass.

“There’s no question we tend to see more no-shows in years when the on-field performance is disappointing to our fans,” Cass said. “You always worry when you sell a ticket and the buyer doesn’t see it as worthwhile to come to the game. That might mean they’re less likely to want to buy season tickets in the future.”

Cass said he’s recently talked to fans who are worried the team won’t reverse its fortunes this season. He’s prepared to see more empty seats Thursday night, because many fans aren’t fond of late games, even under the best circumstances.

The Ravens are fortified by the fact that most of their fan base is locked in to permanent seat licenses and season-ticket plans. That means reported attendance is unlikely to decline. They’ve also still sold more general-admission tickets this season than all but three other NFL teams.

But data from the secondary-ticket market supports concerns about reduced interest.

The $158 average asking price for tickets on the secondary market is down 22.5 percent from the beginning of this season alone, according to TicketIQ, a New York-based company that monitors the market. More strikingly, the average asking price has hit a six-year low, down 46 percent from a peak of $293 in 2013. The average price for tickets to Thursday’s game is $137, the lowest of the team’s remaining home games.

Cass said prices inevitably fall when the team’s not playing well. “So far, knock on wood, it hasn’t affected our season-ticket sales,” he said.

The home crowd has traditionally maintained a symbiotic relationship with a defense that has given the franchise its identity since the Ravens’ first Super Bowl season in 2000.

From the front office down to the players, the Ravens thought they might field another historically good defense in 2017. They re-signed defensive tackle Brandon Williams and brought in veteran defensive backs Tony Jefferson and Brandon Carr in the offseason. They devoted their draft to making the defense younger, faster and more dangerous to opposing quarterbacks.

That effort appeared to be paying off when the Ravens forced 10 turnovers and allowed just 10 points over their first two games. But their performance has eroded over the past five games, especially against the run. A 100-yard rushing day used to be a scarce commodity against the Baltimore defense. In the Ravens’ past three losses, however, Steelers star Le’Veon Bell ran for 144 yards, Jordan Howard of the Bears ran for 167 and Minnesota’s Latavius Murray ran for 113.

Williams, the Ravens’ best interior defender, missed four games with a foot injury. Even with him back in the lineup, the Ravens allowed the Vikings to run for 5.1 yards per carry Sunday.

Beyond their struggles against the run, the Ravens have lost to a rookie quarterback in Trubisky, a backup in Minnesota’s Case Keenum and one of the NFL’s most maligned starters in Blake Bortles of the Jacksonville Jaguars. They’ll face another backup Thursday in the Dolphins’ Matt Moore.

But data from the secondary-ticket market supports concerns about reduced interest.

The $158 average asking price for tickets on the secondary market is down 22.5 percent from the beginning of this season alone, according to TicketIQ, a New York-based company that monitors the market. More strikingly, the average asking price has hit a six-year low, down 46 percent from a peak of $293 in 2013. The average price for tickets to Thursday’s game is $137, the lowest of the team’s remaining home games.

Cass said prices inevitably fall when the team’s not playing well. “So far, knock on wood, it hasn’t affected our season-ticket sales,” he said.

The home crowd has traditionally maintained a symbiotic relationship with a defense that has given the franchise its identity since the Ravens’ first Super Bowl season in 2000.

From the front office down to the players, the Ravens thought they might field another historically good defense in 2017. They re-signed defensive tackle Brandon Williams and brought in veteran defensive backs Tony Jefferson and Brandon Carr in the offseason. They devoted their draft to making the defense younger, faster and more dangerous to opposing quarterbacks.

That effort appeared to be paying off when the Ravens forced 10 turnovers and allowed just 10 points over their first two games. But their performance has eroded over the past five games, especially against the run. A 100-yard rushing day used to be a scarce commodity against the Baltimore defense. In the Ravens’ past three losses, however, Steelers star Le’Veon Bell ran for 144 yards, Jordan Howard of the Bears ran for 167 and Minnesota’s Latavius Murray ran for 113.

Williams, the Ravens’ best interior defender, missed four games with a foot injury. Even with him back in the lineup, the Ravens allowed the Vikings to run for 5.1 yards per carry Sunday.

Beyond their struggles against the run, the Ravens have lost to a rookie quarterback in Trubisky, a backup in Minnesota’s Case Keenum and one of the NFL’s most maligned starters in Blake Bortles of the Jacksonville Jaguars. They’ll face another backup Thursday in the Dolphins’ Matt Moore.